Thirty years of transmediale: Special exhibition explores "alien matter"

Thirty years of transmediale: Special exhibition explores "alien matter"


/ English version, German version below

Thirty years of transmediale:
Special exhibition explores "alien matter"

Press Accreditation: Press accreditation is open until 8 January 2017.
Press Kit: High-resolution images and further information are available in our press kit.
PDF version: Read as PDF here.

 

Berlin, 7 December 2016

On the occasion of its 30 year anniversary transmediale presents the special exhibition “alien matter”, curated by Inke Arns, at Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition will be on view from 2 February to 5 March 2017 within the scope of ever elusive – thirty years of transmediale.

The special exhibition “alien matter” is co-financed by Berlin LOTTO Foundation.

transmediale is funded as a cultural institution of excellence by Kulturstiftung des Bundes since 2004.

“Alien matter” refers to man-made, and at the same time, radically different, potentially intelligent matter. It is the outcome of a naturalization of technological artefacts.

Environments shaped by technology result in new relationships between man and machine. Technical objects, previously defined merely as objects of utility, have become autonomous agents. Through their ability to learn and network, they challenge the central role of the human subject.

Approximately twenty exhibiting artists from Berlin and around the world will present works about shifts within such power structures, raising questions about the state of our current environment and whether it has already passed the tipping point, becoming “alien matter”.

Various artistic positions address four aspects of “alien matter”: artificial intelligence (AI), plastics, infrastructure, and the Internet of Things.

Constant Dullaart applies artificial intelligence pattern recognition, using face, image and speech recognition, in his newly developed artwork DullDream. Dullaart’s software depersonalizes its users by removing specific features of the individual.
The central element of Sascha Pohflepp’s video Recursion is a text about humankind, generated by an AI and recited by performance artist Erika Ostrander, creating a feedback loop between the “artificial other” and ourselves.
Nicolas Maigret’s and Maria Roszkowska’s Predictive Art Bot makes predictions about future art movements and proposes corresponding projects. After their bot was released on Twitter, an open call invited art project proposals and the winning choice will be realized within the context of the exhibition.
In her work HFT The Gardener Suzanne Treister deals with the world of high-frequency traders, operating on the stock markets with special algorithms, so-called trading bots. Treister’s protagonist develops an obsession while monitoring stock prices as they flash by across a screen: With the aid of psychoactive substances the trader attempts to merge his consciousness with the intelligence of an algorithm, so that he can experience the world from its perspective.

Among others, Joep van Liefland deals with the topic of plastics. His monumental sculpture Video Palace #44 – The Hidden Universe, consisting of tens of thousands VHS tapes, evokes the hidden universe of the 1980s home viewing culture.
Within the scope of their project Plastic Raft of Lampedusa the artist duo YoHa (Matsuko Yokokoji and Graham Harwood) dissects a rubber raft: the artists look into the circulation of economic, material and human streams affecting one another.
The jointly created work Xenopolitics 1: Petro-bodies and Geopolitics of Hormones by Aliens in Green (Bureau d'études, Ewen Chardronnet, Mary Maggic, Julien Paris, Špela Petrič) examines the devastating effects of synthetically produced endocrine disruptors, which interfere with hormonal functioning as plasticizers, causing harm to human and animal organisms.

Addie Wagenknecht addresses the Internet of Things with three robot vacuum cleaners that cruise the exhibition. Apart from their initial function, they serve as Wi-Fi hotspots, Tor browsers or signal jammers.
The rocking movement of the electric baby swing in Katja Novitskova’s Swoon Motion, eerily appears human, and in Mark Leckey’s video GreenScreenRefrigeratorAction, a monolithic black smart fridge ponders about its existence in front of a green screen.

Evan Roth’s large-scale sculpture Burial Ceremony, made of 2 km fiber optic cable, focuses on hidden infrastructures. The sculpture is based on Roth’s journey to Cornwall, one of the first sites for laying transatlantic deep-sea cables between Europe and the US, which currently transfer 25% of worldwide data traffic.
Similarly, Jeroen van Loon deals with the cabling of the world. In his installation An Internet he questions how the Internet might look if data were ephemeral. Van Loon ironically shows the vision of a future Internet producing data for brief moments of transmission before it vanishes forever.
Furthermore, included in the exhibition is WorldWideWitch Protektorama—a fictional identity and hysteric-subversive drag character of artist Johannes Paul Raether. Protektorama examines human obsessions with smartphones, looks into wearable devices as body prostheses, and addresses “materiality, fabrication, metals and mines of information technologies”. Protektorama became widely known in July 2016, when she brought the harmless metal gallium into the Apple Store in Berlin and turned it into liquid, which led to a police operation on Kurfürstendamm. The figure belongs to Raether’s performance system Systema identitekturae, developed since 2009.

Morehshin Allahyari’s and Daniel Rourke’s work The 3D Additivist Cookbook, Constant Dullaart’s DullDream, Joep van Liefland’s Video Palace #44 – The Hidden Universe, Johannes Paul Raether’s Protekto.x.x. 5.5.5.1.pcp, Nicolas Maigret’s and Maria Roszkowska’s Predictive Art Bot as well as Xenopolitics 1: Petro-bodies and Geopolitics of Hormones by Aliens in Green will be presented for the first time.

Jeroen van Loon’s An Internet, YoHa’s Plastic Raft of Lampedusa and Sascha Pohflepp’s Recursion are German premieres.

Exhibiting artists: Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke, Aliens in Green (Bureau d'études, Ewen Chardronnet, Mary Maggic, Julien Paris, Špela Petrič), Constant Dullaart, Ignas Krunglevičius, Mark Leckey, Joep van Liefland, Jeroen van Loon, Nicolas Maigret & Maria Roszkowska, Katja Novitskova, Sascha Pohflepp, Johannes Paul Raether, Evan Roth, Suzanne Treister, Addie Wagenknecht, YoHa (Matsuko Yokokoji & Graham Harwood), and Pinar Yoldas.

The program is accompanied by a series of dialogic tours together with curator Inke Arns and various guests, as well as thematic panels held during the festival.

Our press kit contains further information about the artists and their artworks.
Information about ever elusive – thirty years of transmediale is available here.

The special exhibition “alien matter” is co-financed by Berlin LOTTO Foundation.

transmediale is a project by Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH in collaboration with Haus der Kulturen der Welt. It has been funded as a cultural institution of excellence by Kulturstiftung des Bundes since 2004.

Tabea Hamperl
press@transmediale.de
tel: +49 (0)30 24 749 792
http://www.transmediale.de/festival

/ Deutsche Version

Dreißig Jahre transmediale:
Sonderausstellung alien matter erforscht fremde Materie



Presseakkreditierung: Die Presseakkreditierung ist bis zum 8. Januar 2017 möglich.
Press Kit: Im Press Kit finden Sie nähere Informationen und hochauflösende Bilder zum Download.
PDF Version: Hier als PDF lesen.

 

Berlin, 7. Dezember 2016

Anlässlich ihres 30-jährigen Bestehens präsentiert die transmediale vom 2. Februar bis zum 5. März 2017 im Rahmen von ever elusive – thirty years of transmediale die von Inke Arns kuratierte Sonderausstellung alien matter im Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

Die Sonderausstellung alien matter wird von der LOTTO-Stiftung Berlin mitfinanziert.

Die Kulturstiftung des Bundes fördert die transmediale seit 2004 als kulturelle Spitzeneinrichtung.

„Alien matter” ist eine vom Menschen gemachte, ihm aber gleichzeitig radikal fremde, potenziell intelligente Materie. Sie ist das Ergebnis einer zunehmenden Naturalisierung von technologischen Artefakten.

Die von Technologie durchzogene Umwelt führt zu einer neuen Beziehung zwischen Mensch und Maschine: Die bislang als reine Gebrauchsgegenstände definierten technischen Objekte werden zu autonomen Akteuren. Durch ihre Lernfähigkeit und Vernetzung stellen sie die zentrale Rolle des Menschen infrage.

Die rund zwanzig ausstellenden Berliner und internationalen Künstler_innen setzen sich in alien matter mit den Verschiebungen innerhalb dieses Machtgefüges auseinander und beschäftigen sich mit der Frage, inwiefern unsere vermeintlich vertraute Umgebung zu fremder Materie geworden ist.

Die künstlerischen Positionen beschäftigen sich mit vier Aspekten dieser fremden Materie: Künstliche Intelligenz (KI), Plastik, Infrastruktur und Internet der Dinge.

So setzt Constant Dullaart in seiner neu entwickelten Arbeit DullDream der Mustererkennung durch Künstliche Intelligenz – die im Bereich der Gesichts-, Bild- und Spracherkennung eingesetzt wird – ein kritisches Werkzeug entgegen: Seine Software entpersonalisiert abgebildete Personen, indem sie alle spezifischen Merkmale des Individuums entfernt.
Das zentrale Element in Sascha Pohflepps Video Recursion ist ein von einer KI generierter Text über die Menschheit, der von der Performance-Künstlerin Erika Ostrander vorgelesen wird. Pohflepp schafft so eine Feedback-Schleife zwischen dem „künstlichen Anderen” und uns selbst.
Nicolas Maigrets und Maria Roszkowskas Predictive Art Bot trifft Vorhersagen über zukünftige Kunstrichtungen und schlägt dazu passende Projekte vor. Der nach der Veröffentlichung auf Twitter erfolgreichste Vorschlag wurde zur Realisierung ausgeschrieben und wird in der Ausstellung präsentiert.
Suzanne Treister beschäftigt sich in HFT The Gardener mit der Welt der Hochfrequenzhändler, die an den Börsen vor allem mithilfe spezieller Algorithmen, sogenannter Trading Bots, agieren. Treisters Protagonist entwickelt beim Betrachten von auf dem Bildschirm vorbeirasenden Aktienkursen eine Obsession: Er will sein Bewusstsein durch die Einnahme von psychoaktiven Substanzen mit der Intelligenz eines Algorithmus verschmelzen, um die Welt aus dessen Perspektive zu sehen.

Mit dem Material Plastik setzt sich unter anderem Joep van Liefland auseinander, der mit seiner monumentalen Skulptur Video Palace #44 – The Hidden Universe, bestehend aus zehntausenden von VHS-Kassetten, das verborgene Universum der VHS-Heimkino-Kultur der 1980er Jahre heraufbeschwört.
Das Künstlerduo YoHa (Matsuko Yokokoji und Graham Harwood) zerlegt im Rahmen seines Projekts Plastic Raft of Lampedusa ein Schlauchboot in seine Einzelteile: Die Künstler_innen untersuchen damit die Zirkulation ökonomischer, materieller und menschlicher Ströme, die einander wechselseitig beeinflussen.
Die von Aliens in Green (Bureau d'études, Ewen Chardronnet, Mary Maggic, Julien Paris, Špela Petrič) gemeinsam produzierte Arbeit Xenopolitics 1: Petro-bodies and Geopolitics of Hormones untersucht die verheerenden Wirkungen synthetisch hergestellter endokriner Disruptoren, die beispielsweise als Weichmacher für Kunststoffe verwendet werden und durch Eingriffe ins Hormonsystem menschlichen und tierischen Organismen Schaden zufügen.

Addie Wagenknecht thematisiert das Internet der Dinge in Form von drei durch die Ausstellung fahrenden Staubsauger-Robotern, die neben ihrer ursprünglichen Funktion wahlweise als Wi-Fi-Hotspot, Tor-Browser oder Störsender fungieren.
Die Wiegebewegungen der elektronischen Babyschaukel in Katja Novitskovas Swoon Motion erscheinen auf unheimliche Weise menschlich.
In Mark Leckeys Video GreenScreenRefrigeratorAction sinniert ein monolithischer, schwarzer smarter Kühlschrank vor einem Greenscreen über sein Dasein.

Mit Infrastrukturen beschäftigt sich Evan Roth in seiner großformatigen Skulptur Burial Ceremony aus 2 km Glasfaserkabel. Hintergrund der Arbeit ist Roths Reise nach Cornwall, wo sich eine der ersten Anlandungsstellen transatlantischer Unterseekabel zwischen Europa und Amerika befindet, die mittlerweile 25% des weltweiten Datenverkehrs transportieren.
Auch Jeroen van Loon setzt sich mit der Verkabelung der Welt auseinander: In seiner Installation An Internet geht er der Frage nach, wie das Internet aussehen würde, wenn alle Daten flüchtig wären. Paradoxerweise zeigt er damit auch die Vision eines zukünftigen Internets, in dem Daten ausschließlich für den kurzen Moment der Vermittlung produziert werden, um danach für immer zu verschwinden.
Darüber hinaus ist die Weltheilungshexe Protektorama Teil der Ausstellung – eine der vielen fiktionalen Identitäten und hysterisch-subversiven Drag-Charaktere des Künstlers Johannes Paul Raether. Sie beleuchtet die Besessenheit der Menschen von ihrem Smartphone, untersucht tragbare Computersysteme als Körperprothesen und adressiert „Materialität, Herstellung, Metalle und Minen der Informationstechnologien”. Protektorama wurde im Juli 2016 einem größeren Publikum bekannt, als das bei einer Performance im Apple Store Berlin mitgeführte harmlose Metall Gallium sich verflüssigte und zu einem Polizeieinsatz am Kurfürstendamm führte. Die Figur stammt aus Raethers Performancesystem Systema identitekturae, an dessen Entwicklung er seit 2009 arbeitet.

Morehshin Allahyaris und Daniel Rourkes Arbeit The 3D Additivist Cookbook, Constant Dullaarts DullDream, Joep van Lieflands Video Palace #44 – The Hidden Universe, Johannes Paul Raethers Protekto.x.x. 5.5.5.1.pcp, Nicolas Maigrets und Maria Roszkowskas Predictive Art Bot und Aliens in Greens Installation Xenopolitics 1: Petro-bodies and Geopolitics of Hormones werden weltweit zum ersten Mal ausgestellt.

Bei Jeroen van Loons An Internet, YoHas Plastic Raft of Lampedusa und Sascha Pohflepps Recursion handelt es sich um Deutschlandpremieren.

Ausstellende Künstler_innen: Aliens in Green (Bureau d'études, Ewen Chardronnet, Mary Maggic, Julien Paris, Špela Petrič), Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke, Constant Dullaart, Ignas Krunglevičius, Mark Leckey, Joep van Liefland, Jeroen van Loon, Nicolas Maigret & Maria Roszkowska, Katja Novitskova, Sascha Pohflepp, Johannes Paul Raether, Evan Roth, Suzanne Treister, Addie Wagenknecht, YoHa (Matsuko Yokokoji & Graham Harwood) und Pinar Yoldas.

Ausstellungsbegleitend findet ein Rahmenprogramm bestehend aus dialogischen Führungen mit der Kuratorin Inke Arns und verschiedenen Gästen sowie thematischen Panels während des Festivals statt.

Im Press Kit zur Ausstellung finden Sie Informationen zu den einzelnen Künstler_innen und ihren Arbeiten.
Informationen zu ever elusive – thirty years of transmediale finden Sie hier.

Die Sonderausstellung alien matter wird von der LOTTO-Stiftung Berlin mitfinanziert.

Die transmediale ist ein Projekt der Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Die Kulturstiftung des Bundes fördert die transmediale bereits seit 2004 als kulturelle Spitzeneinrichtung.

Tabea Hamperl
press@transmediale.de
tel: +49 (0)30 24 749 792
http://www.transmediale.de/de/festival/

share